How to get a part-time job in Japan: Everything you need to know - Waku Waku

Explore, Experience
Enjoy Japan

How to get a part-time job in Japan: Everything you need to know

Work

How to get a part-time job in Japan: Everything you need to know

How to apply for a part-time job ("baito" in Japanese) is a question asked by many people who either plan to come to Japan or have already stayed there. Today, let's discover all the things I can tell you about how to find a baito!

Tớ là Nhi

Tớ là Nhi

Published on 28 May, 12:00

1. Ask your senpai to introduce you

Asking your senpai is always the easiest way to get a part-time job. Many people have done it this way and I was of no exception.

Normally, there are two situations where you can utilize this method:

  • Your senpai is about to graduate or he/she wants to quit the job
  • Your senpai's workplace needs more staffs

I used to fill in a vacant position as a cashier in a supermarket when my senpai graduated. When you want to look for a job, you can ask your senpai whether their workplaces are recruiting people and whether they can introduce you to that position.

My first job was introduced by my senpai. This was my staff ID card and a small gift I received when leaving the job
My first job was introduced by my senpai. This was my staff ID card and a small gift I received when leaving the job

One good thing when you ask your senpai to introduce you a vacancy is that you can get a baito very easily and quickly. Furthermore, since the one who introduces you is regarded a "guarantor", your interview is not so tense and the possibility to get the job is also high.

However, in order to get a senpai to introduce you, it's important that you maintain good relationships and create broad network. Those who are reserved and not so fond of socializing might find this challenging.

Additionally, when you are introduced to a job this way, you will feel the urge to be more responsible towards your job, as your performance will influence not only you but also the reputation and image of your senpai.

For instance, if you are usually late or absent, your senpai might as well be regarded as someone unreliable, which makes it hard for them to introduce others later on.

When my senpai introduced me to the vacant cashier position, she had to sign a commitment form that if I ever caused any troubles and losses, or if I stole something then couldn't be reached, she would be responsible for all the compensations.

2. Search in the surrounding of your place

This was how I found my second baito. When I considered getting a job closer to where I lived, I took a walk around the surrounding and paid close attention to any available restaurants, food courts, convenience stores and supermarkets to check whether they were recruiting or not.

If they were, I would enter to ask for greater details, hand in my CV and schedule my interview with them.

One tip to successfully find a job in the nearby area is to choose the graduation season (mainly in March and April). When restaurants are short of staff as their employees have graduated, the applying process will definitely be much easier for you!
This is a Starbucks's recruitment notice at its self-service counter. These notices are usually placed around the shop so pay close attention!
This is a Starbucks's recruitment notice at its self-service counter. These notices are usually placed around the shop so pay close attention!

To me, this is the most effective way to find a baito as I can decide where I want to work and which work I want to do.

  • If you are not very active but have good communication skills in Japanese, you can apply to work as a cashier in a nearby supermarket or convenience store
  • If standing still for a long time can easily bore you silly, or if your Japanese is not so fluent, you can try out working as a kitchen-hand in a restaurant

By this way, not only can you get a suitable part-time job but your workplace is also close to your house.

Nevertheless, when you proactively apply for a job by yourself, interview is much difficult and possibility that you get accepted is also lower. I used to apply for 3 positions back then, 1 convenience store, 1 restaurant and 1 supermarket and was only accepted by the restaurant.

Actually, this is understandable seeing that you are a stranger asking for a job. The interviewers tends to be stricter as they don't know who you are, what your personality is, whether you are hardworking and trustworthy or not.

Challenging as it might seem , looking for a baito by yourself is not that hard. My advice for you is to show and impress your employers during the interview with how diligent and enthusiastic you are as well as your willingness to learn.

Above are the 2 most popular ways to apply for baito in Japan introduced together with their pros and cons. Stay tuned for my 2nd part to know more about those seemingly-simple-but-super-useful tips!

2
Tớ là Nhi

Tớ là Nhi

Trust it and you can do it!

From the same author

Experience the Ramen culture at Gokumaru Ramen restaurant (Part 2)

This time, I will share with you what bowls of Ramen at Gokumaru Ramen restau...

Tớ là Nhi Tớ là Nhi · Culture · about 1 year ago

1
Statue of Raccoon Dog - Tanuki no Okimono

When walking around the streets in Japan, especially in Osaka-Kyoto, have you...

Tớ là Nhi Tớ là Nhi · Culture · about 1 year ago

0
Having worked at a Japanese ramen shop for a year, what have I learned?

I used to be a cashier in a supermarket for 6 months, and I have worked at a ...

Tớ là Nhi Tớ là Nhi · Work · about 1 month ago

0

Others also read

Got something wrong on our system. Please reload and try again!
Success action!